EDU270 – Lesson 8: Edu-Blogging

I have been blogging for a few years now personally, but decided to start this blog which has a dual purpose.  

First,  to share my assignments and experiences as a Rio Salado Teaching Intern expanding my knowledge of the theory and practice of education (pedagogy).  Second, to share my experiences in the classroom as a full-time reading teacher.

As my 3rd semester is coming to a close, I am reflecting upon the last 8 weeks and how my blog became an innovative outlet and way to keep me engaged.  I clearly identify with my students when it comes to requiring meaningful learning experiences. Blogging allows me to be hands-on and continually thinking about my next subject.  I can cast vision, keep my writing saw sharpened, educate, and uplift – all from my keyboard.

This semester I learned that our youth have ever changing brains (neuro-plasticity) and their sensory input, attention, emotions, and esteem are all impacted by the environment they are exposed to.  Their language, ability to read well, solve math equations, and relate musically all has to do with what they are exposed to and how they are treated along the way.  The adolescent (specifically male) brain can be impulsive and irrational if not supported in a safe and structured environment.  

I will continue to blog beyond my internship. 

 A future goal (once I am teaching writing) is to develop a classroom blog that my students can showcase their work and parents can read it online, or an online classroom newsletter solely produced by the students.  There are so many ways to incorporate technology in the classroom and I see blogging becoming more commonplace in the near future.

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EDU270 – Lesson 7: Teens Facing Adult Consequences

As a mother, I feel fairly confident about preparing my teenage son for adulthood.  I consistently warn him of the pitfalls that teens face which land them in adult situations too soon.  I say, “You are 18 now, you can not date girls that are younger than you.”  Another popular one, “No, you can’t drive without a permit or license!”  Of course, I go on to explain why and what the consequences are if he chooses not to listen.  Most importantly, I provide “real world” examples.  Most times, he listens.

After reading and pondering the debate about teens lacking adult reasoning capacity, yet being held to adult consequences, I realize my responsibility to educate my students as I do my son.  There are many ways I can do this; such as incorporating real world scenarios in my lesson planning which leads to having candid discussions when there is an opportunity.  

Recently, a group of girls were planning to “jump” one of their classmates after school because of gossip and misinformation.  I decided to get them together and facilitate a ‘sitdown’ meeting.  I believe it was successful because of the level of awareness I brought to the table.  We discussed their intended actions as well as the potential consequences.  Given time to process it, they decided to work it out.  Today, they are all friends and doing well.  They continue to meet with me because they appreciate the opportunity to have an outlet. 

It is researched and scientifically proven that the teen brain is not mature enough to help control impulses or respond rationally; which means they often make snap decisions or judgements and act on them to their own detriment.  Parents, teachers, and other community members exposed to these teens are obligated to pay attention, be available if needed and continuously educate them about potential pitfalls.  


Photo Credit:  Marcos Gomes

EDU270 – Lesson 6: Music and Math

Until this lesson, I had no idea these two were married – Music and Math.

As a student, for years I listened to classical music while studying.  I always said, “It helps me concentrate.”  I really had no idea if that was scientifically accurate or not.  Perhaps it is something I heard or read and instantly adapted to it. I believed it; therefore, it worked.  When I listen to soft classical music, I remain focused and do well academically.

Now, as a teacher I am learning how to effectively incorporate music in the classroom while instructing students.  This is great because I enjoy music as much as my students do.  In fact, this has created a bit of a bond between my students and I.  We discuss music frequently – even different genres.

The core subject I teach is reading.  I have always told myself that I am not ‘good with math.’  I also believed this to the point of being math averse.  I co-tutor students after school.  The majority of the students need assistance with math homework.  I am usually avoiding those students like the plague!  It is not my subject.

The text for this course, “Brain-based Learning” taught me that music and math are married in the sense that they share the following concepts:

  • Patterns
  • Counting
  • Geometry
  • Ratios/Proportions and Equivalent Fractions
  • and Sequences

Although, I do not teach math, I certainly find it useful to understand the connections between the two.  By taking the opportunity to engage my students both mathematically and musically during reading instruction – I will benefit them by enhancing their ability to learn and find meaning in what they are learning.   

EDU270 – Lesson 5: Language and Reading

If I knew then, what I know now…My son’s academic standing could have been vastly different.  I am certain of it!

The good news is that I have years ahead of me to make a difference with hundreds more students who will cross my path.

There is no way for me to go back to early childhood and “redo” anything for my son or my students in the classroom.  The only thing I can do is be aware of scientifically-based research that supports methods to improve the language and reading skills of my son and students.

I am particularly concerned at this point with my student’s growth in ability to read and communicate.

I know that before the age of 3 years old, my students needed to hear the language spoken to them frequently (even as early as in the womb).  They needed a lot of words spoken to them, even complex sentences that they may not have understood then, but would definitely understand later on in life.  I also know that they needed adults to expose them to pre-reading skills – such as, picture (flash) cards, ability to group by sound, and sound for meaning.  Playing word games, singing nursery rhymes, reading books with children, asking them to read aloud, and monitoring their overall progress is essential to them doing better later academically and exhibiting a higher IQ.

So that was in the past.  I am tasked with meeting my students in the present and helping them into a better future.

That means, in my classroom, I lead and encourage my students to:

  • Read as many books as possible (at home and during school hours)
  • Share aloud what they have read
  • Expose themselves to longer more complex sentences
  • Make connections between what they see and what they say (letter – sound)
  • Play word games
  • Use poetry and song lyrics to make connections

 

Because the brain is always reshaping based on what the students are exposed to, it is essential to continue to create enriching opportunities that will only enhance their knowledge and keep them sharp as they grow and mature into adulthood.

 

EdA2Z2016 – Huh?! I didn’t see that in the study guide…!

Yesterday , I took my midterm exam at the college.  Initially I was in total panic mode because the amount of information and types of questions that could be on the exam seemed infinite.  Studying for it even increased my anxiety level for some reason!

The very first essay question threw me! I was staring at the screen in a paralyzed state thinking, “Huh?! I didn’t see that in the study guide…!”

Then, I thought about my students taking their AZ Merit and Galileo (State Standardized tests); and how tough it must be for them. In my empathetic mood, I took a deep breath, smiled, and resumed testing – because in that moment, I remembered why I was there – for them.  

After a few more questions, I went back and answered the first one that stumped me.

Decluttering my head: Letter H

EdA2Z2016 – Humiliation 

Now sometimes you get a student who you think deserves to be taken down a couple of pegs, to be put in their place, and public humiliation might really teach them a lesson. But I believe it is only a skilled few who can accomplish this with enough finesse that they actually help that student become a better person. And isn’t that what our goal should be, ultimately? If we are true masters of our craft, shouldn’t we be able to effectively shut down a disruptive student and maintain our own dignity? Shouldn’t we model the behavior we want to see? 

~Jennifer Gonzalez, Cultofpedagogy.com~

On my road to becoming the best teacher I can be -this reminder to be careful in how I respond to my students is essential to my success!  To read the article this quote was excerpted from go HERE.

EdA2Z2016 – Grammar

According to Dictionary.com, here is the history and origin of the word GRAMMAR:

late 12c., gramarye, from O.Fr. grammaire “learning,” especially Latin and philology, from L. grammatica, from Gk. grammatike tekhne “art of letters,” with a sense of both philology and literature in the broadest sense, from gramma “letter,” from stem of graphein “to draw or write.” Restriction to “rules of language” is a post-classical development, but as this type of study was until 16c. limited to Latin, M.E. gramarye also came to mean “learning in general, knowledge peculiar to the learned classes” (early 14c.), which included astrology and magic; hence the secondary meaning of “occult knowledge” (late 15c.), which evolved in Scottish into glamour (q.v.). A grammar school (late 14c.) was originally “a school in which the learned languages are grammatically taught” [Johnson, who also has grammaticaster “a mean verbal pedant”]. In U.S. (1860) the term was put to use in the graded system for “a school between primary and secondary, where English grammar is taught.”

EdA2Z2016 – Fear

Student:  “Ms. Lyons, someone is talking stuff about me.”  

Teacher: “How do you know?”

Student:  “Someone told me.”

Teacher:  “Who told you?”

Student: “_______ told me.”

Teacher: “Now what?”

There is so much that today’s adolescents deal with on their journey to be educated.  Sometimes the classroom doesn’t feel like a ‘safe’ place – not because of the teacher. It has to do with the interactions amongst themselves and what the teacher is most often unaware of.  Many students live in FEAR because of being bullied.

I called a meeting today to settle a dispute between a group of girls who have been rumored to have fight planned soon – to “jump” a girl.  We started with a casual discussion about community and where each of the started in Elementary school.  Then, I asked trust and loyalty.  If they trust me, I will do the same for them.  That means honesty.  They were open about the things they had said and done towards one  another. There were apologies and more importantly they asked if they could come back and do this again.  

I committed to a once a week ‘sit down’ with the girls.  I was extremely proud of them!  

EdA2Z2016 – Empathy 

I remember what it was like in my adolescence to go to school with a heavy mind and heart. Anticipating the mysteries of adulthood – desiring freedom.  

As a teacher, if I am worth anything, I must have EMPATHY for my students.  On some level, I must be mindful and identify with my student’s feelings, thoughts, and attitudes.

All it takes is a bit of inquiry.  It’s worth it.

Photo Credit: EKG Technician Salary

EdA2Z2016 – Desire to…

As a teacher, I wish I could walk in the classroom and impart knowledge and students get it right away! I wish I could see their reading Lexile scores go above and beyond grade level with nominal effort on my part.  I wish that when I asked questions, there would be a sea of hands waving in the air – anxiously desiring to answer my questions.

I simply wish that a higher percentage of my students possessed the DESIRE to learn.

The reality is so much deeper.  What do they have to look forward to? What inspires them to desire education? Who are their role models? Why would reading literacy out trump their basic need for nurturing and safety?

As a teacher, I must move away from wishing and deal with reality.  It’s tough…